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Full text of "Foreign crops and markets"

Historic, archived document 



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scientific knowledge, policies, or practices. 



FOREIGN CROPS AND MARKETS 



ISSUED WEEKLY BY 
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 
BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 
WASHINGTON. D. C. 



Vol. 34 June 21, 1937 



LATE CABLES..,. 

Scotland area sown for 1937 crops reported as fol- 
lows, with 1936 comparisons in parentheses; wheat 100,000 
acres (94,000), barley 75 , 000 (72 , 000 ) , oats 840,000 
(829,000), potatoes 133,000 (133,000), sugar beets, 7,000 
acres (7,000). (International Institute of Agriculture, 
Rome . ) 

Algeria preliminary estimates of 1937 production 
placed as follows, with 1936 comparisons in parentheses: 
wheat 31,967,000 bushels (29,773,000), barley 22,965,000 
(29,480,000), oats 12,056,000 bushels (12,090,000). (In- 
ternational Institute of Agriculture, Rome.) 

Chosen 1937 estimates of wheat and barley as compared 
with 1936 figures, shown in parentheses, reported as follows: 
wheat, 839,000 acres (818,000), 11,041,000 bushels 
(8,095,000); barley 2 , 685, 000 acres (2,615.000), 62,734,000 
bushels 46,542,000) . (Shanghai office. Bureau of Agricul- 
tural Economics.) 

Brisbane, Australia, Wool sales opened June 16 with 
average selections and keen general competition. Chief 
buyers were from continental European countries. Prices 
ruled firm as compared with those prevailing at the closing 
of the preceding series of Australian sales at Sydney on 
June 10. (Agricultural Attache C. C. Taylor, London.) 



No. 25 



340 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 34, No. 2 5 



GRAINS 

Canadian crops improved 

Crop conditions throughout most of Canada showed a decided improve- 
ment during the first 2 weeks of June, it was reported by telegram from 
the Dominion Bureau of Statistics at Ottawa. Timely rains, followed "by 
"bright warm weather, averted the threatened deterioration of the wheat 
crop in the Province of Alberta. Rapid growth is now apparent both in 
that Province and in Manitoba. In southern Saskatchewan, drought condi- 
tions still prevail. Rains would relieve the feed situation in that area, 
but it is too late for the grain crops to be materially improved. In 
other parts of the Province, general rains would aid crop growth. 

Favorable conditions are reported in the Province of Ontario, but 
wet weather delayed farm operations in parts of Quebec and the Maritime 
Provinces. Pastures are reported in good condition, and the hay crops are 
promising. Good weather has done much to overcome the late start made in 
British Columbia; growth is now rapid, and all crops are responding to 
the favorable combination of higher temperatures and ample soil moisture. 

COTTON 

China cotton acreage increased 

An early estimate of the Chinese cotton acreage for 1937 indicates 
a 10-percent increase in planting compared with last year, according to 
information received from Agricultural Commissioner Owen L. Dawson at 
Shanghai. Later reports may show an even larger increase in acreage. 
It is uncertain at the present time whether some districts in North China 
have had sufficient rainfall for planting. If average yields are obtained 
this season, the Chinese cotton crop will be expected to yield a volume 
approximately the same as. last year's record crop of 3,700,000 bales of 
500 pounds each. If the Chinese crop turns out to be as large as is now 
indicated, the supply of cotton in China the next crop year will be only 
slightly above that of the present season, as the September 30 carry-over 
this year is now expected to be only slightly above that of a year ago. 

Cotton mills in China continue to operate at full capacity. This 
season's activity is the largest for several years. Despite capacity 
operations, cotton stocks in the interior are sufficient for the remain- 
der of the year. Prices of domestic cotton, for both immediate and future 
delivery, have increased. The price of Chinese cotton at Shanghai for 
June delivery is now 13 cents a pound, which is equal to the price of 
Indian. It is reported that about 30,000 bales of Indian cotton have 
recently been booked. The price of American has declined from 17.46 
cents per pound in May to 16.82 cents at the present time. There is very 
little interest in purchase of American, even at the lower quotation. 



June 21, 1937 Foreign Crops and Markets 341 



Yarn prices at Shanghai have been maintained at a very high level , 
The present quotation for August delivery is 20.23 cents per pound, com- 
pared with 18.08 cents last month for July yarn. Mills have their yarn 
production sold forward for several months. 

CHINA: Imports of raw cotton in April 1937, with comparisons 
//(In hales of 500 pounds) 



Growth 



April 


October-April 


1935 


1937 


1935-36 


1936-37 


Bales 


Bale s 


Bales 


Bales 


5,316 


2,073 


42,944 


10,752 


29,882 


1,363 


38,863 


7,332 


2,117 


1,919 


15,093 


19,638 


61 


1,547 


355 


. 16,664 


37,376 


6,902 


97,255 


54,336 



American 
Indian . . 
Egyptian- 
Others . • 



?otal 



CHINA: Stocks in Shanghai public warehouses, May. 31, 1937, 
with comparisons . 



1936 



1937 



Growon 


May 31 


April 30 


.May 31 




Bales 


Bales 


Bales 


American 


4,000 


3,000 


2,000 


Indian 


13,000 


1,000.. : 


1 ,000 


Chinese 


149 , 000 


123,000 . 


133,000 


Egyptian 


2,000 . 


1,000 ' . 


1,000 


Others 


3,000 


'2,000 


2,000 


Total 


171,000 


130,000 


139,000 



EHUITS, "VEGETABLES , AND NUTS 

Expo rts of Canadian apples during 1936-37 light 

Exports of Canadian apples to Europe during the 1935-37 season 
(August to April) amounted to only 4,304,000 bushels, which is the small- 
est quantity exported since 1928-29, when exports dropped to 2,837,000 
bushels, according to an item in the Weekly Emit Intelligence Notes. 
Exports to Europe in 1935-36 amounted to 6,479,000 bushels and in 1933-34 
to 10,111,000 bushels. The bulk of the Canadian exports of apples. goes 
to Europe. The proportion of the Canadian apple crop_ exported in 1936-37 
was 37.9 percent compared with 48 percent in 1935-36 and with 43.4 per- 
cent in 1934-35. 



Exports of apples from Nova Scotia and Ontario totaled 863,000 
barrels, or 2,589,000 bushels, against 1,348,000 barrels (4,044,000 



342 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 34, No. 25 



"bushels) in 1935-36, and 2,256,000 "barrels (6,763,000 bushels) in 
1933-34. Exports from these Provinces were 40 percent "below those of 
last season. Exports from British Columbia amounted to 1,714,000 bushel 
boxes compared with 2,186,000 in 1935-36 and 1,623,000 boxes in 1934-35. 
Exports from British Columbia were 21 percent below the heavy exports of 
the 1935-36 season. Exports of apples from Canada were practically ended 
by the end of January 1937, whereas 1 last season a considerable volume 
moved out in February. Of the total of 863,000 barrels and 1,714,000 
boxes exported to Europe during the season under review, approximately 
'709,000 barrels and 1,706,000 boxes were sent to the United Kingdom. 

Au stria purchases Argentine apples 

In line with the Austrian policy of obtaining outlets for industrial 
products on the basis of compensation agreements, the Berlin office of the 
Bureau of Agricultural Economics reports that the Government of Austria has 
negotiated a trade agreement with Argentina which provides, among other 
things, for the importation of Argentine apples in exchange for Argentine 
purchases of industrial products from Austria. In former years the bulk 
of Austria's apple imports has come from the United States. Now, however, 
Austria feels compelled to obtain imports from those countries willing to 
accept equivalent values of Austrian goods in return. Austria has always 
purchased more from the United States than it has sold to this country. 

Austrian import requirements of apples range from 185,000 to 230,000 
bushels. Under the agreement with Argentina, half the Austrian apple im- 
ports will be obtained from that country. Considerable sales of Argentine 
apples have already been made, and they have been favorably received by 
Austrian consumers. 

.Smaller exports of lemons and oranges , from Italy 

Exports of lemons and oranges from Italy declined in 1936, but ex- 
ports of mandarines were somewhat larger than in 1935, according to the 
Weekly Fruit Intelligence Notes. The exports of 197,768 short tons of 
lemons in 1935 marked the lowest figure in years. The reduction in the 
exports of lemons is explained by the small crop and the high prices 
which prevailed in Italy during 1936. The production of lemons has 
trended downward for several years because of the inroads made on groves 
by a serious disease called "mal secco." Germany is the outstanding 
market. Other important outlets are Austria, France, and Switzerland. 

Exports of oranges amounted to 84,549 short tons, which was the 
smallest quantity exported since 1932. The decline in exports of oranges 
is probably principally accounted for by relatively high prices in Italy 
in 1936, as the crop was the largest since 1932. The production of man- 
darines has trended sharply upward in the last 4 years, and the larger 
exports (10,173 short tons) in 1936 are not surprising. Germany, Austria, 
Hungary, and Switzerland are the most important markets for Italian 
oranges and mandarines. 



June 21, 1937 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



343 



South African prune crop is failure 

The South African dried prune crop this year is a failure "because 
of unseasonable rains, according to C. C. Taylor, Agricultural Attache 
at London. During the years 1926-27 to 1934-35, South African produc- 
tion of dried prunes varied from about 350 to 2,000 short tons annually. 
Practically no prunes will he available for export this year. In 1936, 
275 tons were exported in contrast to the heavy shipments of 1930, when 
1,260 tons were exported overseas. The United Kingdom takes nearly 
all of the prunes exported from the Union of South Africa, the leading 
exporter of prunes in the. British Empire. 

LIVESTOCK, MEATS, AND WOOL 

United States imports of cattle decline 

United States imports of cattle weighing 700 pounds or more, ex- 
cluding dairy cows, during the January-May period this year showed a de- 
cline of 11 percent as compared with those of a similar period in 1936. 
Seventy-seven percent of these cattle came from Canada, whereas last 
year 85 percent was supplied by that country. Mexico, on the other hand, 
has enjoyed an appreciably larger share of the trade in this item at the 
reduced-duty rate, furnishing 23 percent of the total as against 15 per- 
cent during the comparable months a year ago. 

In 1936, the bulk (58 percent) of the year's total imports of 
heavy slaughter cattle occurred in the 3 months April, May, and June, 
with a very marked decline in monthly receipts after the first of July. 
January imports this year were unusually high, 27,872 head as against 
10,893 head in January 1936.. They were probably the result of the ten- 
dency to hold back shipments at the end of the 1936 quota year in order 
to take advantage of the reduced duty effective January 1. In February 
1937, imports of heavy cattle declined to little more than half the January 
figure and have been maintained through May at about 17,000 head per 
month. The maintenance of monthly imports at a markedly lower level 
than during corresponding months of 1936 reflects the decline in Canadian 
cattle numbers and the adverse weather and feed conditions experienced in 
certain important cattle-raising areas of the Dominion in the summer of 
1936 and the winter of 1936-37. It is particularly significant in view 
of the materially higher prices obtainable for slaughter cattle in the 
American markets this year. Cattle prices in Canadian markets, however, 
also have been at unusually high levels. 

Imports of calves the first 5 months of this year have run well 
above those of last year, totaling 41,000 head by May 29, a figure not 
reached in 1936 until nearly the middle of July. Practically all of the 
cattle in this group come from Canada. If imports during the first 2 
weeks in June were continued at the rate recorded for May, the quota on 
calves has now been exhausted and the full duty of 2.5 cents will be 
charged on such imports. In 1936 this quota was not filled until August 8. 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 34, No. 25 



Imports of dairy cows were slightly heavier the first 5 months 
of this year than in the same period of 1936. Only 12 percent of the 
total quota for the year, however, had been used to May 29. 



UNITED STATES: 



Imports of quota cattle to May 29, 1937, 
with comparisons ' 



Country 


: Under 175 pounds 


1 vw 

Beef cattle 


Dairy cows 


and year 


Import s 


Share of 
quota a/ 


Imports 


Share of 
quota b/ 


Imports 


Share of 
quota c/ 


From Canada 


Number 


Percent 


Number 


percent 


Number 


Percent 




19 , 625 
40,535 


37.79 
78.05 


91,735 
73,999 


58.88 
47.49 


1,837 
2,443 


9.18 
12.21 




From Mexico 


1936 


1,283 


2.47 


16,468 


10.57 


0 


0.00 




525 


1.01 


22,398 


14.38 


0 


0.00 


Total : 




20,908 
41,060 


40.26 
79.06 


108,203 
96,397 


69.45 
61.87 


1,837 
2,443 


9.18 
12.21 





Compiled from records of the Customs Bureau. 

a/ 51-,933 head, b/ 155,700 head, c/ 20,000 head. 

British bacon import quotas extended 

The British Board of Trade has again extended the existing quota 
rates for imports of foreign cured pork into the United Kingdom. No sat- 
isfactory substitutes for the Pigs and Bacon Marketing Schemes have as 
yet been worked out. Until the domestic problem has been settled, there 
will probably be no change in the quantities permitted importation from 
non-Empire countries. Continuation of the present rate of imports (ap- 
proximately 11,383,000 pounds per week) amounts to a reduction of 1.5 
percent from the rate established for the same period a year ago. The 
United States share in the quota remains 8.1 percent of the total. 



New Zealand has record wool season 



Wool sold in the 1936-37 New Zealand season, closed April 30, had 
a total value of £14,900,000 ($59,165,000), the highest figure on record,- 
according to Vice Consul G-. B. Lane at Wellington. The 1935-36 figure 
was £9,840,000 ($38,917,000). About 664,000 bales were sold in 1936-37 
against 737,000 bales in 1935-36, according to figures released by the 
New Zealand Wool Brokers Association. The volumes sold in the past 2 sea- 
sons were the largest recorded for the Dominion. The large 1935-36 fig- 
ures are accounted for by the heavy carry-over from 1934-35. The average 
1936-37 price of 15.82 pence (26.17 cents) per pound was 73 percent higher 
than the 1935-36 average, and the highest since 1927-28. There was prac- 
tically no carry-over into -the 1937-38 season, and operators generally 
anticipate another favorable series of sales. 



June. 21, 1937 



Fo re ign G rop s • and Markc t s 



3:45 



INTERN AT I QMAL TR4DE IN COTTON, AUGUST-APRIL, 1936-37 

In the -August-April period of 1936-37, 10,271,000 "bales of cotton 
entered the channels of world trade. This was a marked gain over the 
2 preceding years when the total stood at 8,159,000 hales and 9,831,000 
bales, respectively. Exports from the United States were at a lower 
level but most of the other principal exporting countries, namely 
British India, Egypt, Brazil, and Argentina, reached new high records. 
Exports from- Peru totaled 204,000 bales, second only to the 234,000 
bales exported during the same 9 months of 1935-36. So far this season, 
the Lhiited States has supplied 48 percent of the world total in compari- 
son with the 10-year av-elags, 1923-24 to 1932-33, of 67 percent, British 
India 26 percent as against 20 percent, Egypt 16 percent as compared with 
11 percent, and Brazil 6 percent as compared with less than 1 percent in 
the 10-year period. 

Principal ex porting count ries 

U nited Sta tes; Exports of cotton from the United States daring 
the 9 months ended April 30 amounted to 4,985,000 bales. This was a de- 
cline of 429,000 bales or 8 percent when compared with a year earlier. 
In comparison with the 10-year average, this represented a decrease of 
2,106,000 bales or a decline of 30 percent. Japan continued to rank 
first as an outlet for American cotton, taking 1,410,000 bales or 28 per- 
cent of the total exports. This was a substantial advance over the 2 
years immediately preceding and also over the 10-year average. British 
markets "'absorbed 1,066,000 bales as against 1,210,000 last season. Canada 
took 233,000 bales, apeak figure, and exports to France, Sweden, and 
the Netherlands were slightly larger than in the August-April period of 
the last 2 years. Exports, to all other principal importing countries 
fell off. 

British India : Exports from British India amounted to 2,711,000 
bales, a peak figure. Average exports for the 10 years, 1923-24 to 
1932-33, amounted to 2,085,000 bales and in 1935-35 to 2,251,000 bales. 
Japan took 56 percent of this season's total, or 1,530,000 bales. For 
the first time Indian exports to Japan exceeded United States exports 
to Japan. The United Kingdom ranked second as a purchaser of the Indian 
fiber, taking 363,000 bales or 13 percent of the total, also a new high 
record. Both Italy and Belgium took more cotton than during the same 
9 months of last season. 

Egypt : In the 9 months ended April 30, 1937, Egypt exported 
1,589,000 bales of cotton. This compares with the 1923-24 to 1932-33 
average of 1,192,000 bales and with 1,384,000 bales exported in the 
same 9 months of 1935-36, representing gains of 33 percent and 15 per- 
cent respectively. A little more than one- third went to the United 
Kingdom, with Japan taking 13 percent and France 11 percent of the total. 
Except for the United States, all the principal importing countries 



y Foreign Cropte'-and Markets " Vol. 34, No. 25 



INTERNA! I ORAL TRADE IN COTTON, AUGUST-APRIL, 1935-37, CONT'D 

took more than the 10-year average. The United Kingdom increased takings 
to 546,000 bales, the highest for any like period' end Japan took 200,000 
bales in comparison with 90,000 "bales, last season. 

Brazil: After some recession in 1935-36, exports from Brazil 
rose to about 654,000 bales. This was more than 8 times the 10-year aver- 
age and was 15 percent greater than 'the previous peak reached in 1934-35 
when exports stood at 567,000 bales. At least two-thirds of these ex- 
ports go to the United Kingdom and Germany. 

Per u and Arg entina; Exports from both Peru and Argentina have 
been marked by an almost continuous upward trend. Peruvian exports which 
had averaged 136,000 bales during 1923-24 to 1932-33, rose to approximately 
204,000 bales so far this season and exports from Argentina advanced from 
46,000 bales to 128,000 bales in 1936-37. 

COTTON: Summary of world trade, August-April, average 
1923-24 to 1932-33 and seasons 1933-34 to 1936-37 



August-April 





• Qp-antity 


Exporting 
countries 


• Average 
j 1923-24 

; to 

i 1932-33 


; 1933-34 


j 1934-35 


i 1935-36 


j 1936^37 




; 1,000 


• 1,000 


; 1 , 000 


: l.ooo 


: 1,000 




bales 


j bale s 


• bales 


! bales 


; bales 


United States 


7,091 


: 6,862 


; 4,088 


j 5,424 


;' 4,985 


British India 


2,085 


: 1,831 


: 1,872 


\ 2 , 251 


: 2,711 


Egypt 


1,192 


| 1,555 


1 1,364 


• 1,384 


i 1,589 


Brazil 


77 


145 


i 567 


: 420 


ia/ 654 


Peru 


136 


155 


I 188 


; 234 


•a/ 204 


Argentina 


46 


42 


80 


: 118 


: 128 


Total 


10,627 


10,590 


8,159 


: 9,831 


' 10 , 271 




percentage of total 




Percent 


Percent • 


Percent ■ 


Percent 


Percent 


United States , 


67 j 


65 : 


50 


55 : 


49 


British India 


20 '• 


17 : 


23 : 


23 • 


26 


Egypt ; 


11 ! 


15 ; 


17 • 


14 : 


16 


Brazil ; 


l : 


i ; 


7 : 


4 : 


6 


Peru | 


l i 


% : 


o ' 


3 i 


2 


Argentina j 


W : 


i i 


i i 


l 


1 


Total ■ 


100 : 


ioo ; 


100 j 


ioo ; 


100 



Compiled from official sources. 

a/ Statistics for April are estimated. 

b/ Less than 0.5 percent. 



June 21 j 1937 foreign Crops and Markets 3^7 



INTERNATIONAL TRADE HI COTTON, AUGUST -APRIL, 193 6-3 7 , CONT'D 



COTTON: Destination of exports from the principal expo 
August-April, average 1923-21+ to 1932-53 ^ jjjjMg 



rting countries, 
to 1936-37 a/ 



Destination 
of exports 
from principal 
exporting 
countries 



Quantity 



-Aug us t-Ap ril 



Percentage of total 



Average; 
1923-2U 

to 
1932-33 



1934-35 



1935-36 



1936-37 



Average 
1923 ~2l| 

to 
1 932-33 



1935-36 



1936-37 



Exports from the 
United States to 

Germany* 

United Kingdom. 

Prance 

Italy 

Spain •* ....... 

Belgium 

Netherlands ... 

U.S.S.R. 

(Russia) d/ . • 

Sweden 

Portugal ...... 

Poland & Danzig 

Other Europe . . 
Total Europe. 

Canada ......... 

Japan 

China ......... 

British India.. 

Other countries 
Total 
British India to 

J apan ......... 

Italy 

China . , 

Germany , 

Belgium ....... 

United Kingdom* 

Prance 

Spain 

Netherlands ... 

Other countries 
Total ....... 



• * • ♦ • 



»•««•• 



1,008 

22S 

217 
143 
138 

130 

105 

43 
2S 



2,085 



1,000 


1,000 


. 1,000 


j 1,000 










hales 


"bales 


hales 




Percent 


'Percent 


[Percent 


[Percent 


1,638 


287 


j 709 


: 602 


i 23 


: 7 


: 13 


i 12 


I.604 


630 


1,210 


: 1,068 


: 23 


: 15 


: 22 


: 21 


786 


3 42 


65O 


i 66U 


: 11 


8 


: 12 


: 13 


594 


4lS 


338 


j 326 


8 


: 10 


: 6 


i 7 




cLdXj 


195 




U r 


: . ''5 


: )l 
; *+ 


: 9.1 


168 


73 


157 


1 l4S 


2 


' 2 


: 3 


i 3 


123 


52 


63 


: sk 


2 


: 1 


: 1 


: 2 


113 


6 


0 


1 


2 


. sJ 


i 0 


| £/ 


52 


77 


73 


i 79 


1 


: 2 


: l 


: 2 


38 


33 


4s 


: 34 


1 1 


: l 


i 1 


i 1 


17 


175 


236 


161 


2/ 


i 1+ 


: 1+ 


: 3 


56 


78 


86 


107 


c/ 


3 


c 


: 2 


5,41+7 


2,391 


3,7^5 


3,274 


77 




69 


: 66 


172 


183 


207 


233 


2 




4 


: 5 


1,11*0 


1,335 


1,376 


1,1+10 


16 


33 


25 


: 28 


2U3 


110 


1. 35 


14 


3 


3 


1 


c/ 


. 7^ 


2+8 


7 


12 


1 


1 


£/ 


c/ 


15 


21 


3^ 


1+2 


1 


1 


1 


1 


7,091 


4,088 


^424 


'4.985 


100 


100 


100 


100 



995 
199 
57 
89 

104 

197 
100 

38 
28 



1,127 
71 

77 
192 
150 

331 
lll+ 
1+6 
30 
113 



1,530 
153 

9 

121 

233 
363 
91 

e/ 21+ 
18L 



48 
11 
10 

7 
7 

6 

5 
2 

1 

_1_ 



1.872 ■ 2.251 2,711 



100 



53 
11 

3 
5 
6 
11 
5 

n 

1 

100 



50 
3 
3 

Q 

7 

15 

5 
2 

1 



100 



£/ 



56 
6 

1+ 

9 
13 

3 



* Includes shipments through the free port of Bremen, much of which is afterward re- 
shipped to other countries. According to German official trade returns, imports of 
•American cotton for consumption in Germany amounted to 150,000 bales in the August 
to April period of 1936-37; 377,000 hales in 1935-36; and 286,000 hales in 1934-35- 

Continued - 



348 



Foreign props and Markets Vol. 34, No. 25 



INTER1TATI ONAL TRADE IN COTTON, AUGUST- APRIL , 1936-37, CONT'D 

COTTON: Destination of exports from the principal exporting countries, 
August-April, average 1923-24 to 1932-33 and 1934-35 to 1935-37, cont<d 



Destination 
of exports 
from principal 
exporting 
countrie s 



Average 
1923-24 

to 
1932-33 



Quantity 



August-April 



1934-35: 



1935-36 





: 1,000 


: 1,000 


: 1,000 


j 1,000 












' hales 


: hale s 


: hales 


: bale s 


■ Percent 


: Percent 


•Percent 


:Percent 


exports from 


















Egypt to 


















United Kingdom. 


469 


j 369 


j 473 


546 


: 39 


: 27 


j 34 


i 34 




154 


\ 152 


■ 195 


• 177 


: 13 


: 11 


j 14 


: n 


tt„ ' i . j ei JL J. - 

United States . 


142 


: 48 


i 45 


: 59 


: 12 


: 3 


: 3 


: 4 


Germany 


86 


j 101 


j 126 


:' 120 


: 7 


: 7 


: 9 


i 8 




78 


: 125 


: 76 


: 89 


: 7 


: 9 


:' 5 


: fi' 




55, 


: 149 


: 90 


: 200 


: 5 


: n 


; 5 


: 13 


Switzerland . . . 


53 


: 57 


: 46 


• 66 


: 4 


: 4 


: 3 


: 4 




38 


\ 81 


j 78 


i - '■% 


: 3 


: 6 


: 6 


i cj 


U.S.S.R. 


















(Russia) .... 


37 


\*J 




i f / 


: 3 








Czecho Slovakia . 


25 


' 40 


• 55 


: 63 


: 2 


: 3 


j 4 


: 4 


British Inida . 


19 


\ 104 


■ 54 


: 76 


2 


: 8 


: 4 


: 5 


Poland & Danzig 


10 


j 30 


; 28 


: 27 


1 


: 2 


2 


i 2 


Other countries • 


26 


108 


j 118 


: 165 


2 


: 9 


10 


i 9 


Total 


1,192 


1,364 


• 1.384 


: 1,589 


100 


100 


100 


100 




August-March 


Brazil to '• 






















170 : 


175 ; 


197 : 




32 1 


48 j 


32 






Jb/ i 


6 : 


68 ! 




a] j 


. 2 : 


11 


United Kingdom. 




217 ■ 


ioi : 


200 : 




41 : 


27 ! 


33 


Netherlands ... : 




20 : 


16 • 


15 i 




4 : 


4 • 


3 


Italy : 




17 : 


6 : 


38 : 




3 1 


2 ■ 


6 






47 : 


26 ; 


30 i 




9 : 


7 ; 


5 






21 i 


8 : 


17 ■ 




4 


2 


3 


Poland • 




\l i 


3 : 


12 i 




s/ i 


1 i 


2 


Belgium-Luxem . : 




34 j 


24 | 


18 ; 




6 : 


7 i 


3 


Other countries : 




2 : 


i : 


14 : 




l j 


c/ ; 


2 




Rl 75' 


528 ' 


366 : 


609 : 


100 : 


ioo : 


ioo : 


100 



1936-37 



Percentage of total 



Average 
1923-24 

to 
1932-33 



1934-35 



1935-36 



Compiled from official sources. 

a/ Bales of 478 pounds net, except for the United States which are in hales of 
500 pounds gross, h/ Less than 500 hales, cj Less than 0.5 percent, d/ Be- 
ginning January 1, 1935, includes Russia in Asia, e/ Seven months, August-Pebruary. 
f/ If any, included in "Other countries." g/ No data available by countries. 



June 21, 1937 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



349 



COTTON: Price per pound of representative raw cotton at Liverpool, 

June 1] T frith, comparisons 



Growth 



Fair) 



American - 

Middling .... 

Low Middling 
Egyptian (Fully Good 

Sakellaridis . 

Uppers 

Brazilian (Fair) 

Ceara 

Sao Paulo .... 
East Indian - 

Broach (Fully Good) .... 

C.P.Oomra 1Tb. 1, Superfine 

Sind (Fully Good) . . 

Peruvian (Good) 

Tanguis 



1937 



April 
23 



Mac 



Cents 



15.42 
13.87 



24,49 
20.17 

14.08 
15.00 

12.45 
12.56 
11.81 

19.64 



30_ 

Cents 



14.88 
13.33 

23*08 
19.04 

13.54 
14.45 

12.14 
12.24 
11.50 

19.10 



7 



Gents 

15.32 
13.78 

23.76 
20.14 

13.99 
14.91 



12.63 
11.89 

19.54 



14 ja/ 20 -~ 28 



Cent s 



14.65 
13.10 

22.73 
19.34 

13.31 
14.24 

12. C8 
12.18 
11.64 

19.87 



Cents 

15.01 
13.47 

22.75 
19.87 

13.67 
14.60 

12.33 
12.44 
11.90 

19.23 



Cents 



15.15 
13.61 

23.80 
20.15 

13.81 
14.74 

12.35 
12.45 
11.59 

19.37 



June 



Cents 



15.01 
13.47 

23.14 
19.28 

13. 68 
14.60 

12.48 
12.59 
11.52 

19.01 



11 



Cent s 

14.51 
12.97 

22. .28 
18.34 

13.18 
14.10 

12.15 
12.25 



Converted at current exchange rate. 

a/ Thursday prices, due to holiday Friday. 



BUTTER: Price per pound in New York, San Francisco, Copenhagen, and London, 
J une 7, 1937, with comparisons 



Market and description 



New York, 92 score 

San Francisco, 92 score 

Copenhagen, of ficial quotation 
London : 

Danish 

New Zealand 

Dutch 



1936 



1937 



June 18 


June 10 


June 17 


Cents 


Cents, 


Cents 


30.2 


31.0 


31.0 


31.5 


32.0 


33.0 


20.1 


19.5 


19.9 


25.7 


25.1 


25. 5 


24.1 


24.2 


; 24.4 


23.8 


23.5 


23.7 . 



Foreign prices converted at current rates of exchange. 



350 



Foreign Crops and Market; 



Vol. 34, No. 25 



BUTTER : New Zealand grading, 1936-37 season to June 4, 
with comparisons 



• Date r 


: 1934-35 


• 1935-35 


i 1936-37 


?sek ended 


; 1,000 pounds 


1 1,000 pounds 


■ 1,000 pounds 






August 1 to March 26 


248,991 


: 272,306 


! 284.133 


April 2 


5,712 


; 6,440 


: 7,056 


9 


5,768 


5,600 


6,406 


16 


4,558 


5,656 


6,216 


23 


4,760 


4,704 


5,712 


30 


4,480 


4,704 


5,247 


April total 


25,278 


27,104 . 


30, 637 


May 7 


3,696 


3,864 


4,256 


14 


2,856 


2,968 


3,136 


21 


2,576 


2,296 


2,912 


28 


2,015 


1,950 


2,240 


May total 


1.1 , 144 


11,088 


12, 544 


June 4 


1,512 ; 


1,456 


1,792 


Total August 1 to June 4 


286,925 i 


311,954 ■ 


329,106 



Agricultural Attache C- C. Taylor, London. 



BUTTER: Australian grading, 1936-37 season to May 22, 
• with comparisons 



Date 



1934-35 


1935-36 


1936-37 


1, 000. pounds 


1,000 pounds 


: 1,000 pounds 


182,750 


, 153,5(54 


: 111.344 




195.254 


151,724 


w 

a/ 

i 


3,761 

2,733 
3,076 
2,701 


4,178 
4,200 
3,644 
3,223 


_ - 


12,271 


15,245 


a/ 


2,222 
1,557 
1 , 308 

970 


2,444 
2,554 
1,452 
1,496 


b/ 182,750 : 


213,582 


174,915 



Week ended 
July 1 to January 30 
July 1 to March 27 . , 

April 3 

10 

17 

24 

April total 

May 1 

8 

15 

22 



Weekly Dairy Produce Notes, Imperial Economic Committee, a/ Not available, 
b/ Total to January 30. Later statistics not available. 



June 21, 1337 Foreign Crops and Markets 

SCOTLAND: Acreage of specified grains, 1932-1937 



351 



Year of 
harvest 


Wheat 


Barley 


Oats 


Potatoes 


Sxtgar "beets 




1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 




acres 


a^cres 


acres 


acres 


acres 


1932 


52 


69 


S67 


149 


1 


1933 


7S 


60 


856 


153 


2 


1934 


SB- 


96 


816 


; 140 


8 


1935 


101 


77 


827 


1^2 


7 


1936 


94 


72 


829 


: 133 


7 


1937 


100 


75 


840 


133 


7 



International Institute of Agriculture, Home. 



HOGS AND PORK PRODUCTS: 



Foreign and 
April 1937, 



domestic average prices per 100 pounds, 
with comparisons 



Item 



Hogs , Chicago, "basis 
packers' and shippers' 
quotations. ........ 



ellow; 
ive 



Corn , Chicago, No. 3 
Hogs, heavy, Berlin, 

weight 

Barle y, Leipzig 

Lard ~ 

Chicago * 

Liverpool. 

Hamburg. ........... 

Cured por k - 

Liverpool - 

American short cut green 
hams .................... 

American green "bellies... 
Danish Wiltshire sides... 
Canadian green sides .... 



I909-I9I3 
average 



Dollars 



1925-1920' 
average ^- l 9 3b 



Dollars 



Dollars 



s.04 
1.11 


12.05 
1.65 


10.47 

1.13 


10.11 
2.07 


9-97 

2.41 


11.18 
1.77 


13.78 

2.37 


17.70 

a/ 3-33 


16.79 
3.30 


16.79 
3.34 


10.33 
11.70 
12.90 


14.73 
15.02 

15.43 


11.90 

13^5 
12.78 


13.15 

1)4.79 

14.18 


12.62 
14.76 
13.23 


14.10 
15.00 

1U.16 


' 23.72 
20.56 

24.55 
h/ 21.55 


20.88 
Nominal 
20.46 
17.70 


20.63 
16.87 

19.50 
17*34 


20.31 
17.02 
20.72 
18.48 



Mar. 1937 



Dollars 



a/ Breslau market. Leipzig quotation not available, 
h/ Pour-year average only. 



Apr. 1937 



Dollars 



352 



Foreign Crops and' Markets 



Vol. 34, No. 25 



HOGS MD POFK PRODUCTS: Indices of foreign, supplies and demand, 







; October- April 


Count ry 
and 
item 


Unit 


1909-10 

to 
1913-14 


1924-25 

to 
1928-29 


1933-34 


j 1934-35 


jl935~36 


: 1936-37 








average 










UNITED KINGDOM: 
















^TTiTll IPC r\ nrn p c;+* n n 
















frs^l tjOtV T.nnrlori 


Yimi ?1 Q 
W*J-li Li. S 




39 , 277 


47, 211 


52,140 


; 57,274 


53,645 


Imports - 
















Bacon - 


















« 


140 , 624 


292,492 
33,417 


285, 744 
19,558 


; 252,234 
28,322 


i 31,841 


: 214,474 
i 33,356 


Irish. Pree State. 


ii 


United States. 


n 

H 


111,875 

Pft 57T 


66,293 
45,364 
89,129 


3,228 
57,422 
153,647 


2,020 
65,263 
113,111 


: 1,009 
• 53,055 
•105,234 


: 890 
95,158 
; 104 , 258 




It 


23,978 




II 


300,048 


526,695 


519,601 


,460,949 


424,423 


449,136 




ii 


131,658 
52,215 


156,855 
70,739 


183,035 
44,885 


133,684 
40,234 


97,327 
37,405 


94,025 
40,175 


Ham, Total 


ti 


CANADA: 




SI aiiMitei* — * 
Hogs, inspected 


1,000s 


1,010 


1 , 674 


1,809 


1,818 


1,839 


2,613 


GERMANY : 
















Production - 
















Hog receipts ! 


II 




1,916' 


1,976 


• 2,059 


1,402 


2,310 


Hog slaughter [ 








IJ 


2, 612 

1,669 
1 23.290 


2, 3bb 

11,146 
134, 571' 


2, 639 

17,454 
81,177 


2, 757 

16,907 
34,311 


1 , obb 

15,391 
62, 565 


so I 

11,853 
39,006 


Imports - ! 


1,000 

pounds 
ii 




UNITED STATES: i 




Slaughter - : 
Hogs, inspected...; 
Sxoorts ' 


1, 000 s 


19,732 


29,303 


27,363 


21,556 


18,355 


24,676 


Bacon ! 


1,000 














United Kingdom. . . 


pounds 
it 


78,385 
1,145 


40,387 
6,862 
12, 29 / 


1,584 
2,400 
2 , b fv 


1,148 

0 


390 
13 


454 
0 




ti 


4 ,40b 


<d, rol 


bU4t 


DUU 




ii < 


106,958 


85,390 


14,192 


5,137 


1,584 


1,765 


Hams-, shoulders - 
United Kingdom. . . 


ii 


80,219 


82,848 


30,590 


25,737 


19 , 234 


16,640 


Total 


ii 


92,762 


99,490 


35,910 


31,672 


-22,551 


■19,786 








Lard - 
United Kingdom. . . 


ii 


102 , 520 


136,501 


177,215 


83,939 


37,996 


30,916 




tr 


86,057' 
21,065 
23,377 


112,673 
48,198 
26, 510 


48,737 
8,455 
16,699 


2,513 
18,683 


4,351 
12,293, 
40' 


1,036 
19,241 




ii 




it 


9 


12 




ti 


285,333 


437,782 


319,106' 


114,164: 


57,097: 


49,230 



June 21, 1937 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



353 



EXCHANGE RATES: Average weekly and monthly values in New York of 
specified currencies, June 12, 1937* with comparisons a/ 



Country 


: Monetary 
I Unit 


: ' Mmvfch 


Week ended 


: 1935 i 193b : 1937 


1937 


May 


May 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May 


May 

29 


June 


June 
12 






Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 

















Argentina. 
Canada. . . . 

China 

Denmark. . . 
England. . . 
France. ... 
Germany. . . 

Italy 

J apan ..... 
Mexico. . . . 
Netherlands 
Norway. . . 
Sweden . . 
Switzerland 



Paper peso. 
Dollar 
Shang. yuan 

Krone .1 

Pound. . 
Franc ... 
Reichsmark 
Lira* • • 
Yen. . . . 
Peso. . . 
Guilder 
Krone. . 
Krona. . 
Franc. . 



33*56 
99.90 

Ui.io 

21*82 

kss.js 

6.59 

Ho. 25 
S.23 

28.73 
27.79 
67.62 

24.56 
25.20 
32.32 



1 33*u 
' 99*21 
29.69 
22,18 
•496.97 
6.59 
40.28 
7.S6 
29.0S 
27.76 
67.63 

24.97 
25.62 

32.39 



32.57 
■LOO. 05 
29.66 
21.81 

i+ss.51 
4.59 

40.22 

5.26 

28.49 

21.15 

54.70 

24. 54 
25.19 
22.79 



32.77 
•LOO. 12 

29.71 
21.94 

^91. 63 
4.50 
40.21 
5.26 
28.64 

27.75 
54.76 
24.70 
25.34 
22.79 



32.93 
•100,15 
29.80 
22.05 

493.99 
4.48 

40.17 
5.26 
28.78 

27.75 
54.94 
24.82 
25.46 
22.87 



32.94 
100.08 
29.79 
22.05 
494.07 
4.47 
40.14 
5.26 
28.78 

27.75 
5^,98 
24.82 

25.47 
22.85 



32.85 
99.99 
29.71 
22.00 
492.78 
4.45 
40.07 

5.26 
28.69 

27.75 
54.98 
24.76 
25.40 

22.82 



32.89 
99.98 
29.63 
22.03 
^■93.47 

4.45 
40.04 

5.26 
28.72 

27.75 
54.98 

24.79 
25.44 
22.85 



Federal Reserve Board, a/ Noon buying rates for cable transfers. 



LIVESTOCK AND MEAT: Price per 100 pounds in specified European markets, 
June 9. 1937 , w ith compa risons a / 



Market and item 



Week ended 



June 10, 
1936 



June 2, 
_JL 937 



June 9» 
-1937 



Germany: 

Price of hogs, Berlin.. 

Price of lard, tcs., Hamburg....... 

United Kingdom: b/ 

Prices at Liverpool first quality - 

American green bellies 

Danish Wiltshire sides 

Canadian green sides 

American short cut green hams.... 
American refined lard 



Dollars 



17.70 
11.39 



Nominal 
20.07 
17.83 
21.90 
11.73 



Dollars 



17.31 
14.05 



17.05 
20.06 
17.42 
20.90 
15.29 



Dollars 



17.31 
14.01 



17.07 
19.17 
16.52 

20.93 
15.05 



Liverpool quotations are on the basis of sale from importer to wholesaler, 
a/ Converted at current rate of exchange, b/ Week ended Friday. 



354 



Foreign- Crops and Markets 



Vol. 34, No. 25 



Index 



Page 

Late cables . . . . 339 



Apples: ' '■ 

Exports, Canada, 1935-37 341 

Import prospects for Argentine, 

Austria, 1937-38 ■ 342 

Barley : . . 
Area: : 

Chosen, 1936,1937 339" 

Scotland, 1932-1937 339., 351 

Production: 

Algeria, 1936,1937 ...... 33 # 9" 

Chosen, 1936', 1937.. 33*9 

Butter: 
Gradings : 

Australia, May 22, 1937 350 

•'• New Zealand, June 4, 1937 350 

Prices,' specified markets, 

June 17, 1937 349 



Cattle, imports, U. S. , May 1937. 343 
Citrus fruit, exports, Italy, 1935 342 
Cotton: 

Acreage increase, China, 1937.. 34C 

Imports, China, April 1937 341 

'International trade, 

August -April 1936-37 345 

Prices, IT. K. , June 11, 1937.. . 349 
Production prospects, China, 

1937 340 

Stocks, Shanghai, May 31, 1937. 341 



Fage 



Exchange rates, foreign, 

June .12, 1937 353 

Grains : 

Growing conditions, Canada, 

June 15, 1937 340 

Oat s : 



: Area, Scotland, 1932-1937... .339 ,351, 

Production, Algesia, 1936,1937. 339 
Pork: • 

Import quota extension, U fi K. ,-, 344 

Prices, foreign- markets , 

June 9', 1937-.-.. ........ 353' 

Potatoes, area, Scotland, 

1932-1937 . 339,351 

prunes, exports, South Africa, 

1936 •••••• 343 

Sugar beets, area, Scotland, 

1932-1937 339,351 

Wheat : • • • .... 

Area: 

Chosen, 1935,1937 339 

Scotland, 1932-1937 339,351 

Production: 

Algeria, 1936,1937 339 

Chosen, 1936,1937 339 

Wool: 

Sales : 

Australia ( Brisbane ) , 

June 16, 1937 339 

Tew Zealand, 1936-37... 344